The Page Not Found Error is one of the more frustrating errors you can experience as a webmaster or a marketer. It often pops up when you’re trying to navigate your way to a page that doesn’t exist on your site. Even more frustrating is the fact that it’s nearly impossible to find a single, straight answer on how to fix this issue.

Thankfully, I’ve been through this exact pain point and have found a simple fix that allows you to access all the pages on your website without error. So let’s dive into how to find the Page Not Found Error in ClickFunnels and what you should do (and not do) to eliminate these frustrating issues once and for all.

How to Find the Page Not Found Error in ClickFunnels

As I mentioned above, the Page Not Found Error often pops up when you’re trying to access a page that doesn’t exist on your site. To give you a better idea of what’s going on, here’s a screenshot of the error that I often receive when I try to access a page that doesn’t exist:

As you can see, Google has kindly pointed out the error for me and suggested that I try a few different URLs to see if I can access the page. In this case, the page doesn’t exist on my site but rather on GoDaddy’s servers. Fortunately, GoDaddy’s support team was also kind enough to provide me with an answer. So let’s jump into how to fix this problem once and for all.

The Simple Solution

The first step is to determine if the error is actually being generated by your site or by GoDaddy’s server. Chances are, it’s the latter. When users navigate to a page that doesn’t exist on your site, Google’s error message typically points to the server rather than the site. That means if you’re experiencing this problem on your site, there’s a good chance it’s actually an issue with your site’s code rather than WordPress itself.

So the first thing you should do is contact the web developer who created the page in question and ask them if there’s any reason why it wouldn’t be displaying or if it’s an issue on your end. Odds are, it’s the former but you should still try to figure out why the error is appearing in the first place.

Avoid These 4 Things & You’ll find the Page Not Found Error rarely

Now, while there’s nothing wrong with wanting to eliminate as many errors as possible from your site, sometimes it’s necessary to maintain legacy links or features. In these cases, it’s better to add an 301 redirect to your site rather than try to fix the Page Not Found Error. For example, if you own a website that’s been around for a while and you decide to switch hosts, it can be difficult to find the redirects needed because almost all hosts come with ‘pre-installed’ redirects. So, in this case, it might be easier to let the page stay and create redirects for it later (if needed).

Another thing you can do is to use dedicated IP addresses rather than shared ones. When you use shared IP addresses, it becomes much more difficult to tell if a link will take your visitors to the correct page or take them to a different site altogether. Using dedicated IP addresses helps eliminate this problem. In most cases, shared IP addresses are automatically provided by your host but you can ask them to give you a custom one if you run into issues. For example, if you run a free Tumblr blog and you want to use myplugin.com to provide you with a much better experience, you can ask them to give you a dedicated IP so that when someone clicks on a link to myplugin.com, they’ll be automatically redirected to your blog.

Still another thing you can do is use HTTPS rather than HTTP to secure your site. When someone visits your site using HTTP, the connection is unencrypted and open to interception by others. Using HTTPS ensures that when someone clicks on a link, it’ll take them to the right place regardless of whether or not they’ve been previously intercepted.

Use A Reverse Proxy To Secure Your Site

One of the simplest yet most effective solutions to eliminating Page Not Found Errors is to use a reverse proxy. A reverse proxy is basically a security guard that sits in between your internet connection and your site. When someone clicks on a link to your site, the browser will request the URL from the proxy rather than your site’s actual IP address. In this way, you can ensure that no one will ever see your site’s content unless you desire them to.

To learn more, here’s a short tutorial on how to install a basic reverse proxy on your site (in under 30 minutes):

In the tutorial above, we’ll use Namecheap’s free simple proxy solution to create a quick and easy reverse proxy. After you’ve installed the solution, you can return to your site’s dashboard and add a reverse proxy with a simple click (as demonstrated below).

Always Use A Captcha

One of the things that causes Google’s error messages to surface is when a site doesn’t use a captcha (or a weak one at that). A captcha is a method of preventing automated form submissions. There are many free and premium captcha solutions available – the key is to choose one that’s easy for humans to read but difficult for machines to decipher (i.e. sphinx). You can also use reCAPTCHA rather than relying on Google’s proprietary reCAPTCHA V2.

Use A Custom 404 Error Page

When a user follows a broken link or types in the wrong URL, they’ll often see a 404 error rather than the page they were seeking. To protect your site from these errors, you can create a custom 404 error page. When a user clicks on a broken link or types in the wrong URL, they’ll be automatically redirected to your custom 404 error page rather than the default WordPress page.

To create a custom 404 error page, use WordPress’ built-in ‘Not Found’ error template. Simply replace the placeholder text with your own specific message.

For example, let’s say you have a hair salon located at http://www.hairsalon.com. If someone types in ‘hair saloon’ as a URL, they’ll see a 404 error rather than the site’s actual content. To fix this, you can use the above placeholder in WordPress’ ‘Not Found’ error template and replace it with:

“Oops…that page doesn’t exist! If you’re looking for a different destination, please click here.”

Now, whenever someone visits your site and types in the wrong URL, they’ll be automatically redirected to your custom 404 error page rather than the default WordPress page.

As you can see, there’s a lot that you can do to prevent the Page Not Found Error. However, as frustrating as these errors can be, it’s still preferable to have minimal errors rather than none at all.