A few years back, entrepreneurs were happy to pay thousands of dollars to learn marketing and sales funnels that they could then replicate and scale. Today, with the advent of software like Clickfunnels, the process of creating a sales funnel has become a lot easier and a whole lot more affordable.

Clickfunnels gives you everything you need to create a fully functional sales funnel, including a shopping cart built-in.

What is a sales funnel? It’s essentially a series of steps that a prospect must go through in order to become a paying customer or complete a transaction. For example, if you sell shoes, your sales funnel might look like this:

  • Attracting potential customers with an online ad
  • Conversion: getting them to click on a link or enter their email address
  • Acquisition: getting them to make the first purchase
  • Retention: making them come back for more
  • Upselling: getting them to buy more than they need
  • Customer delight: keeping them coming back for more
  • Exit strategy: getting them to leave the store (or website)

While it’s awesome that Clickfunnels offers a prebuilt shopping cart for our shoe example above, this isn’t always the case. If you’re looking for a specific feature that the prebuilt shopping cart doesn’t offer, you’re out of luck. You’ll have to build a shopping cart from scratch with Square or OneClick.

But if you don’t want to build a shopping cart from scratch, you’ve got another option: integrate a third-party vendor’s shopping cart into your Clickfunnels account. The great thing about this option is that you don’t have to match their pricing structure to enjoy the benefits of having a shopping cart inside your Clickfunnels account. In other words, you get to choose your own pricing!

Choosing Your Own Prices

As a marketer, you’ll most likely be asked to justify your pricing often. But as a business owner, you don’t have to answer to anyone but your customers. If your pricing is based on how long it takes you to build a shopping cart from scratch or if you add a certain number of features to the product, your customers will thank you for being upfront about your costs.

For example, if you sell a shopping-cart-lessified product that is based on a free trial, but you know that some features are more expensive than others, you can list the features and the price upon which you’ll charge. Listing the features and the price upon which you’ll charge is also known as productising or bundling. When you productise a service or a product, you create more value for your customers by unbundling the price of each individual feature. In the case of our shoe example above, productising the service would mean that the customer only pays for attracting and converting visitors (costs associated with getting visitors to click on your link or enter their email address), and acquiring new customers. The retention and upselling is a service that you provide to the customer once they’ve converted. Customer delight is a feature associated with keeping the customer, and selling more is a goal that you help the customer achieve.

When you productise a product or a service, you create more value for your customers by unbundling the price of each individual feature. In the case of our shoe example above, productising the product means that the customer only pays for attracting and converting visitors, and acquiring new customers. The retention and upselling is a service that you provide to the customer once they’ve converted. Customer delight is a feature associated with keeping the customer, and selling more is a goal that you help the customer achieve.

Why Productise?

There are a variety of benefits to productising a product or a service, including the following: